Fidelis Cybersecurity
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Maria Glendinning
Business Development and Channel Marketing Manager

Maria has worked at Fidelis Cybersecurity for over 5 years. She progressed from a role of an ISR to now Business Development and Channel Marketing Manager covering EMEA region. She is based in the UK.... Read More

Cybersecurity Awareness Month Quiz

We’ve reached the end of Cybersecurity Awareness Month! Throughout our journey toward better awareness, we’ve explored the various roles of the people, processes, and tools that keep organizations and individuals safer in the digital world. Now, it’s time to test your cyber knowledge.

Take the quiz and see how you score!

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Answer: D

Remember: security is everybody’s responsibility. By understanding cybersecurity basics, including your organization’s policies, and taking simple steps to keep your devices and accounts secure, you help keep your organization—and yourself—safer in the digital world.

Answer: C

Once an attacker gets in via phishing, your only recourse is re-fortifying any compromised accounts. Immediately change any passwords linked to the phishing attack and ensure that multifactor authentication is enabled wherever possible. Additionally, you can run a deep scan with your virus checker to ensure your computer wasn’t infected with malware as a result of the attack.

Answer: D

Ransomware does the most damage when the attack is allowed to spread. By switching off your PC and disconnecting from the company network, you can stop the attack at the point of entry. Your IT department can take over to ensure the attacker is neutralized and proper defences get put in place to thwart additional ransomware attempts.

Answer: A

Similar to how a bank will never send you a link, official organizations will also never call and ask you to provide account information. If you receive a call like this, hang up immediately and call your bank. You’ll want to inform them of the phishing attempt, and you can also verify your account status.

Answer: B

Even if a link in a text message looks official, it could easily redirect you to a phishing site. Just like with your bank information, utility companies and other organizations that retain personal information will never send you a link to click. So when you see a message like this, don’t click it! Instead, open a browser, navigate to the company’s official site, and log in using your account information.

Answer: B

Installation of any unapproved application on a work laptop – by any method – is not only risky, but it may violate company policy. IT departments have a library of vetted, up-to-date applications for your use that are legally licensed and closely monitored for software vulnerabilities and required patch updates.

Answer: C

Financial institutions will never ask you to click a link in a message to get to your account. Always access your accounts through valid and secure mechanisms, such as going directly to their website, using an official mobile app, or making a direct call to customer support.

Answer: C

Everyone is responsible for cyber security. Most cyber incidents start with human error. Common mistakes like weak passwords, clicked phishing links, lack of multifactor authentication, misconfiguration of cloud services, and insecure coding practices leave the doors open for cyber adversaries.

Answer: B

While some of the better phishing attempts include good spelling and grammar, most messages betray themselves as unauthentic through certain tell-tale signs. Always look closely at emails and text messages – even when they appear to come from someone you know. Double-check the sender’s email or phone number to ensure correct spelling, and never provide personal or account information over email or text!

Answer: D

Everyone is responsible for cyber security. Most cyber incidents start with human error. Common mistakes like weak passwords, clicked phishing links, lack of multifactor authentication, misconfiguration of cloud services, and insecure coding practices leave the doors open for cyber adversaries.